About Molly and Tuxedo Cats

 

This is Molly, my black and white (tuxedo) kitten. She was born during the first week of June in New Hampshire. We came across her when one of my other pets needed surgery and we brought him up to New Hampshire where my aunt and uncle own a veterinarian clinic. I was unable to go to New Hampshire on that trip because I had work. When my mom arrived home from New Hampshire the next night, she had a brand new kitten with her. Molly spent the month of August with me in my room getting acclimated to her new home as well as giving me a companion for the last month of summer break. She initially had a home, but the owners becaome concerned that it would have been a bad home for a kitten. She was at my aunt and uncle's clinic and needed a new home. My parents knew that I love tuxedo cats and decided to bring her home. We later decided on the name Molly for our new kitten. She is a very loving kitten who adores people and attention. Now that I am back in Springfield most of the time, she enjoys hanging out with my dad while he works, closely watching his computer monitor.

What Makes Tuxedo Cats Special

Black and white is always associated with black tie events and regal dinners with gents in suits and ladies in ball gowns. What is a tuxedo cat? It doesn’t take a lot of thought to see why they’re called tuxedo cats. Named after men’s formal attire, tuxedo cat characteristics are quite unique. These cats have a solid black coat with white fur patches all around their throat, chest, paws and belly areas. Markings can also include a black mustache, which makes this gorgeous feline even more irresistibleת but the rarest of all and the most handsome one is the tuxedo kitty “wearing” a bow tie. Referred to as “black ties”, these charming felines are believed to be lucky charms, especially in terms of wealth and good fortune. Because of their good nature, they do well with other pets at home, even with cats’ rather common foes, better known as canines! Oddly enough most tuxedo cats are almost dog-like, with their friendly nature, love for cuddling and the way they follow their humans around the house quite happily. A tuxedo cat that lives indoors can live up to 15 years but a tuxedo living outdoors will only make it to about five. It is important to remember that tuxedo cats aren’t a breed in their own right, but rather categorized by their bi-color markings. A tuxedo is generally nicer than other cats; they are smart, friendly, affectionate and more vocal. They also seem to love their owners more compared to other felines. Of course, we know coloring has absolutely nothing to do with the personality traits of a cat. But when it comes down to the breed’s characteristics, it seems the black and white cat has a friendlier nature.

Tuxedo Cat Personality

Tuxedo cats are often compared to dogs because of their lively and energetic nature. They are also often very social cats who love the company of humans much like a dog, they love to sit on your lap for a stroke. They are fairly vocal compared to most cats and are often thought to be among the most clever of cats however this will depend upon their breeding. They are usually quite strong independent characters who are completely comfortable with or without company, consequently they often wander into trouble! Tuxedo cats are very smart. Some say they are more intelligent than regular cats. There may be an intelligence difference of as much as 200% between a tuxedo and a regular cat. A 200% intelligence margin is a statistic thrown around by tuxedo cat owners. How can you doubt the intelligence of a tuxedo cat? The tuxedo cat has ruled the Kit-Cat Clock Company for 81 years. This beloved keeper of time, has graced homes. Now this classy tux had both intelligence and staying power. Their intelligence makes them born leaders. In the 2012 election season a tux named Tuxedo Stan campaigned for mayor of Halifax, Canada. Stan was a visible champion of Halifax’s stray cat problem and advocated a city-sponsored spay/neuter and cat care program to help his constituents.